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e2001 - Abstracts

Abstracts of Papers Published in the Conference Proceedings - Section 1.5: Work and Sustainable Development

Section 1.5: Work and Sustainable Development
Accommodating the New Economy: The SANE Space Environment Model
A. Harrison
The Case for Immaterialisation
S. Simmons, D. Leevers
TERRA Project Integration Using IFs
B.B. Hughes
eBusiness and Sustainable Development
T. Schauer
Internet-Based Labour Markets: Status Quo and Potential
K. Gareis, A. Mentrup
Interventions for Sustainable Employment in the Information Society for Disadvantaged Groups
S. O'Donnell, C. Duggan
New IST-Based Work Methods and the Family: The FAMILIES Project
K. Cullen
The Impact of the Digital Economy on Leadership in Organisations
M. van Leeuwen

Accommodating the New Economy: The SANE Space Environment Model
Andrew HARRISON
DEGW, Porters North, 8 Crinan St, London, N1 9SQ, United Kingdom

Sustainable Accommodation for the New Economy (SANE) is a two year EC-funded research programme considering the combined impact of the new economy on people, process, place and technology to identify new ways of accommodating work. Its focus is on the creation of sustainable, collaborative workplaces for knowledge workers across Europe, encompassing both virtual and physical spaces. The key operational goal of the project is to develop a unified framework for the design of sustainable work places in Europe. This multi-disciplinary framework will generate designs that will allow distributed organisations to take full advantage of coming advances in location independent computing and ubiquitous networking. SANE will broaden the range of workplace design parameters to include consideration of degrees of privacy and relations between physical and virtual spaces. By embracing considerations of public and private space the workspace environment model developed will locate the office environment in the wider context of the sustainable urban development and the regeneration of European cities. This paper describes the work currently being undertaken by the SANE project's Space Environment Modelling work package which is led by DEGW. This work package focuses on the architectural aspects of the human environment in organisational settings. Other key theoretical packages are Human Environment Modelling which examines communications and interaction in physical and virtual environments and Processes and Tools which will examine current and likely future technology tools and processes to support the distributed workplace.

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The Case for Immaterialisation
Stephen Simmons(1) and David Leevers(2)
(1) Addico Cornix Ltd, Cornwall
(2) Vers Associates, 37 Beacon Way, Rickmansworth, Herts WD3 7PF, United Kingdom

The ASSIST study in the I.S.T. programme sets out to explain one of the most fruitful ways in which I.S.T. may contribute to Sustainable Development, namely immaterialisation. In this paper, immaterialisation is placed in the context of the well-established Total Environmental Stress approach to ecologically-defined sustainable development. In this approach, dematerialisation is associated with production and supply; whereas immaterialisation is associated with consumption and demand. These distinctions are expanded and the different development trajectories and wider significance of the two classes of reduction in material consumption use are detailed. Aspects of a proposed taxonomy for immaterialisation are discussed. From this taxonomic stance, the proposition is made that immaterial substitution for material consumption is likely to be extremely indirect. This proposition is examined by the use of a specific example, illustrating the use of the ASSIST taxonomy. The methodology proposed for the further development of the taxonomy is described, and thus the means by which guidance will be extracted on the future RTD agenda in this area, and also on the design of the IST applications which will be required in order to gain maximum advantage from immaterialisation.

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TERRA Project Integration Using IFs
Barry B. Hughes
RAND Europe and the University of Denver
Denver, Colorado 80208, USA

The TERRA project intends to provide a sound base for European policy deliberations around the emergence of the New Economy and the unfolding of its consequences for society and sustainable development. The project will produce a rich library of scenarios, a set of tools for forecasting and analysis, and a social discourse. One important tool of the project will be a scenario analysis and computer modelling system, called SIFT (Scenario Investigation for TERRA), built on the base of the existing International Futures (IFs) modelling platform. The SIFT model will represent the interaction of global and regional demographic, economic, energy, agricultural, socio-political, and environmental systems. This paper will describe the foundational structure of IFS, outline the transformations that are underway for SIFT, and prepare to demonstrate the emergent capabilities of SIFT.

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eBusiness and Sustainable Development
Thomas SCHAUER
Research Institute for Applied Knowledge Processing, PO Box 2060, 89010 Ulm, Germany

By IST we are starting to create a fascinating globalised world of eBusiness which will have implications for the social and environmental dimension of sustainability. The challenge of the new century will be the integration of eBusiness in a sustainable development pathway by supporting changes of consciousness, by integration of external effects into the price system on a European level and by development of environmentally friendly technologies.

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Internet-Based Labour Markets: Status Quo and Potential
Karsten GAREIS and Alexander MENTRUP
empirica GmbH, Oxfordstr. 2, 53111 Bonn, Germany

Growing use of the Internet may lead to an increase in the efficiency of the matching process on labour markets, as can be shown using a rational, economic logic based on transaction cost and job search theory. Together with business process re-engineering and other organisational trends, this might lead to what has been called the "dawn of the e-lance economy" in which freelancers get in touch with clients via the Internet, work as teleworkers, and transfer work results via ICTs. What are the factors that support electronic freelancing and what reasons speak against a wide-scale implementation of this work form? In this paper, we look specifically at one segment of the labour market that has been shown to be in the vanguard of ICT usage as well as flexible work organisation, i.e. multimedia specialists. We found that the Internet has clearly influenced the behaviour of labour market participants in this field, but its effect on freelancing and the development of virtual organisations is likely to be limited by a number of factors, e.g. by the need of personal promotion using traditional means that often rely on face-to-face interaction and well-established trust relationships.

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Interventions for Sustainable Employment in the Information Society for Disadvantaged Groups
Susan O'DONNELL(1) and Cannel DUGGAN(2)
(1) Models Research, Dublin, Ireland
(2) WRC Social and Economic Consultants, Dublin, Ireland

It is clear that key social challenges - such as long-term unemployment and educational disadvantage - are restricting the movement of women and men experiencing disadvantage into sustainable employment in the information society. At the same time, many individuals have been supported in their transition to sustainable IS employment through innovative EMPLOYMENT Initiative projects across Europe that addressed these socio-economic challenges. This article will first discuss the findings from evaluations of two interventions in Ireland; both took place in the same disadvantaged urban community but had different target groups, interventions methodologies, and outcomes. The article will conclude with a description of a new IST research project, KISEIS, that will build on initial lessons by studying key interventions across Europe for sustainable employment in the information society for disadvantaged groups.

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New IST-Based Work Methods and the Family: The FAMILIES Project
Kevin CULLEN
Work Research Centre, 1 Greenlea Drive, Dublin 6W, Ireland

FAMILIES is an IST programme socio-economic research project focusing on the implications of new methods of IST-based work (eWork) for work-family balance in Europe. This paper outlines the importance of the topic for key areas of European policy and presents some initial results from the project. The results to date include an analytic model of the impacts of eWork at the work-family interface and some initial findings on socio-economic aspects, and on technology at the work-family interface, from an in-depth study of 100 families in four countries. The final results are expected to provide guidance for policy consideration, for technology research and development, and for larger-scale socio-economic research on the topic.

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The Impact of the Digital Economy on Leadership in Organisations
Manon VAN LEEUWEN
Foundation for the Development of Science and Technology in Extremadura
Manuel Fdez. Mejias s/n, 2a planta
06002 Badajoz, Spain

The world economy is in transition. It is moving from the industrial age to a new set of rules - that of the "Information Society" or "digital economy, this will change everybody's work, affecting the flow of new ideas into enterprises, their management, organisation and procedures. These changes have major impact on the skills and attributes necessary for successful and effective leadership, and although some of these based on traditional values, there are others that need to be added for the Digital Economy. Leadership is an improvisational art, the game keeps changing, competition keeps changing, therefore leaders need to change and to keep reinventing themselves, they have to be ready to adapt, to move, to forget yesterday, to forgive, and to structure new roles and new relationships for themselves, their teams, and their ever-shifting portfolio of partners, and they need to have the capacity to employ more than one style of leadership.

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