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e2001 - Abstracts

Abstracts of Papers Published in the Conference Proceedings - Section 1.1: Strategy and Policy

Section 1.1: Strategy and Policy

Joining the Internet Ecosystem
R. Lloyd
Driving Change through e-Business - The Case of Canon
S. Pilotti
An Industry-Driven Approach to International e-Business Cooperation
T. Gulledge
A Million e-Businesses, Interacting with a Billion People, through a Trillion Interconnected Intelligent Devices …
R. Sarucco
B2E Mobile e-Business: Driver, Passenger or Spectator?
S. Dyson
'Think Global, Act Local'
F. Tengberg
e-Business and e-Work: The Challenges Ahead
R. Zobel and N. Sadeh

Joining the Internet Ecosystem
Robert LLOYD
President of Europe, Middle East and Africa, Cisco Systems

The dotcom phenomenon was a blot on the Internet landscape. It left many industry commentators and businessmen alike believing that the savings and increased sales that the Internet can deliver are nothing but myth. But businesses, small and large, are realising the true benefit that the Internet can deliver. A recent study Gartner undertook with Cisco Systems predicts that the Internet Economy in Europe will grow from $53 billion in 1999 to $1.2 trillion only five years later. Is this hype in itself? Cisco doesn't think so. This paper examines this maturing of a marketplace that is coming to accept the value the Internet can bring to companies. It also suggests a simple five-stage model that maps the way that businesses, especially small and medium sized businesses, can best use the Internet to reap its long term gains.

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Driving Change through e-Business - The Case of Canon
Stefan PILOTTI
Head of Corporate Planning, Canon Europa

Many major business changes take place in response to a crisis but the best time to undertake a major change is when the business is sound, allowing the time to properly plan moves and make good decisions. Canon Europe decided it was time to change its image and used e-business to drive this change. Four task forces took a corporate approach to turn the company upside down knowing that it was necessary to get fourteen countries to agree on functionality for a pan-European system. They planned a European portal with four main e-services and it was soon realised that the company faced a steep learning curve to reach the desired level of harmonisation. During the implementation process Canon has already learned many lessons about sharing information and standardisation to reach a cross border service. E-business has been the enabler for without it, the necessary changes would not have been achieved. It is brought noticeable gains in efficiency, best practice, knowledge sharing and better communication. It is creating new management structures and greater customer focus.

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An Industry-Driven Approach to International e-Business Cooperation
Thomas GULLEDGE
George Mason University, Enterprise Engineering Laboratory, Mail Stop 2E4, Fairfax, Virgina 22030 USA

International research, development, and implementation programmes for e-Business technologies are difficult to design. Effective implementation requires that the transferring and receiving organisations be integrated as a single team. This paper discusses a successful approach for transferring complex e-Business technologies to Asia to support the development of an aerospace e-Hub. The approach involves joint laboratory development with private companies, universities, and government organisations. The hands-on laboratory work is supplemented with training workshops. The objective is to build relationships and generate ideas in the workshops and follow that with hands-on laboratory-related research and development, and eventually implementation.

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A Million e-Businesses, Interacting with a Billion People, through a Trillion Interconnected Intelligent Devices …
Roberto SARACCO
Director of Future Centre San Salvador, Telecom Italia LAB

After the enthusiasm deriving from the potential of e-Business and Internet as a way to shorten the distance from the producer to the consumer and cluster enterprises we are seeing new trends emerging: much less "pure clicks" and much more "bricks and clicks", new businesses emerging as response to the vanishing of some "rings" in the value chains, a new perception of what really matters to people when buying on-line and on the horizon a new, unprecedented set of buyers, intelligent agents and objects. We are also seeing an ongoing transformation of the concept of buying itself: more and more we no longer buy, we rent. No longer we are interested in ownership, rather in borrowing (at a price). On the other hand more and more consumers are leveraging the potential of the network to become -from time to time- providers and therefore the legions of copyright marauders confront themselves with ownership sensitive peoples. The paper takes a look at these emerging trends and looks at what technology has in store in the near future as well as the stumbling blocks ahead.

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B2E Mobile e-Business: Driver, Passenger or Spectator?
Simon DYSON
IBM UK, Bedfont Lakes, Middx, UK

Mobile e-business has the potential to deliver business-to-employee interactions capable of creating signiticant competitive edge. The real-life advantages of mobile access to business critical applications require that all organisations, including technology builders, have strategies in place for interacting with their own employees. The business-to-employee (B2E) opportunity will be the starting place for the real, extended application of mobile e-business.

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'Think Global, Act Local'
Freddy TENGBERG
CEO, The Buyonet Group
Eklandagaten 55
S-41261 Goteboq
Sweden

Buyonet is an early example of a 'pure' ecommerce business, whose transactions take place entirely online. By delivering goods digitally, Buyonet, and therefore end user, saves on delivery, packaging and warehousing costs. While operating globally, Buyonet takes into account regional differences, by implementing localised payment systems and site design. Since its inception in 1997, The Buyonet Group has overcome the difficulties of finding a bank willing to process online payments, has managed to resolve issues of differing taxation, privacy and encryption laws and has successfully overcome instances of fraud. This paper outlines Buyonet's experiences of building and maintaining online stores for itself and others, addressing the legal, physical and practical implications of global ecommerce.

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e-Business and e-Work: The Challenges Ahead
Rosalie ZOBEL and Norman SADEH
New Methods of' Work and Electronic Commerce
Information Society Directorate General - The European Commission

The economic and social implications of the Information Society Technologies will continue to grow in importance. Within the IST programme Key Action II is supporting Europe's ambition to become the world leader in this area. The paper reviews Key Action II's activities over the past three years and looks forward to 2002 and the Sixth European Framework Programme.

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