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e2000 - Abstracts

Abstracts of Papers Published in the Conference Proceedings - Section 1: Business, Strategy and Policy

Section 1: Business, Strategy and Policy
Towards a mobile Information Society
G. Wahlberg
Infoville: A large-scale implementation of a Smart Community model
M. Pérez Muro
Social Inclusion in the Information Society
G. Hall
Time-to-Knowledge: The New World Challenge
M. Couzens
Achieving European Competitiveness in a Knowledge Based Economy
M. Auckland
Electronic Procurement
S.R. Leonard
Helping UK Small Firms into the Digital World
J. Searle
e-Europe and the IST Programme
R. Zobel
Prime Minister's Questions
M. Collins
Defining a framework for the new economy indicators : Challenges for companies performance and Public policy
A. Bounfour
Successful E.Commerce Business Design
C.H. Benitez
eBusiness and Organisational Change
P. Jackson, L. Harris
The Spread of Telework in 2005
K. Gareis, N. Kordey

Towards a mobile Information Society
Göran WAHLBERG
Director Concepts & Technology
Nokia Corporation
Düsseldorf
Germany

Mobile communication goes broadband. One of the main features of the 3rd generation mobile cellular telecommunications systems is the broad bandwidth. The 3rd generation is an evolutionary step in mobile communication, but will create a revolution in mobile service provisioning. This opens up the door for a location and time independent access to most of the information society services, including broadband Internet access. The implementation in Europe will start 2002. The 3G system will allow for a huge number of new services especially tailored for mobile use and in addition a full broadband access to Internet.

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Infoville: A large-scale implementation of a Smart Community model
Manuel Pérez Muro
Oracle Ibérica. Madrid. Spain

In 1996 the Regional Government of Valencia (Spain) launched a project to improve the region's overall competitiveness by implementing an Information Society strategy for all of its four million citizens and public and private entities. So far the project is expanding successfully, and nine cities are already using this model. The basic principles that made it successful are explained in the paper.

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Social Inclusion in the Information Society
George HALL
Director of Corporate Affairs
ICL
London, United Kingdom

This paper examines government initiatives in the field of the information society and problems associated with these. A way forward based on a bottom up approach involving as many actors as possible in a local community is proposed which it is believed is more likely to deliver tangible and sustainable results.

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Time-to-Knowledge: The New World Challenge
Mike COUZENS
Vice President, Corporate Communications & Training
Cisco Systems,
Uxbridge, United Kingdom

Unlike the Industrial Revolution that occurred over hundreds of years, the Internet revolution will be over in two to three decades. Those countries and companies that do not respond quickly to the challenges and opportunities the Internet creates will simply get left behind. In this fast-changing, knowledge-based environment there will be two equalisers in life, the Internet and Education. Together they will change business, political and social avenues, levelling the playing field between people, companies and countries. E-learning, Internet-enabled learning, will provide businesses and educational institutions with the mechanism, skills and information they need to turn change into an advantage in the Internet Economy. This paper sets out to illustrate Cisco's vision for E-learning, the benefits it can deliver as a business application, its impact on life-long learning opportunities, and the competitive advantage it bestows on organisations and individuals that implement it.

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Achieving European Competitiveness in a Knowledge Based Economy
Marc AUCKLAND
BT Chief Knowledge Manager
Milton Keynes, United Kingdom

The European Round Table (ERT) is a group of 47 leaders of major European companies covering 18 European countries with a combined turnover greater than 800 billion Euros. Together they employ nearly 4 million people world-wide. In October 1999, key managers from ERT companies involved in all aspects of knowledge management met for a two-day workshop on managing in the new economy. Hosted by BT at their Adastral Park research laboratory, these senior managers believed that knowledge management and the emerging knowledge economy were of such importance for the continued competitiveness of Europe that a paper should be prepared for the ERT and used to help influence Key European bodies and business. The following are the conclusions following interviews with these key knowledge leaders, discussions with leading experts and gurus from academia, companies around the world and the lead members of ERT who guided the develop of the recommendations.

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Electronic Procurement
Steven R LEONARD
President EDS E.solutions EMEA
Uxbridge, United Kingdom

The Internet's rapid growth has driven many companies to add an electronic commerce component to their operations to gain competitive advantage. Business-to-business online procurement has recently emerged as one of the hottest topics in the world of commerce and technology. The growth of the Internet and commercial web-based applications is offering ever-increasing operational cost savings to enterprises, extending trading communities and lowering the financial barriers to e-commerce participation. Once the advantages of electronic commerce are recognised, there is an upsurge in the desire to implement a full Electronic Procurement solution - motivated largely by the significant return on investment (ROI) that it can potentially deliver to organisations. Reducing indirect procurement costs can immediately improve an organisation's bottom line. Furthermore, in an increasingly competitive business environment, companies can also re-deploy procurement and administrative resources for more strategic purposes. This paper explores the challenges, the solution and implementation of electronic procurement.

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Helping UK Small Firms into the Digital World
Jenny SEARLE
Director, Information Society Initiative, Department of Trade & Industry,
London, United Kingdom

The Information Society Initiative is a DTI-led initiative to promote the use of information and communications technology within specific segments of UK society; in particular small and medium-sized enterprises. This presentation will describe the experiences of this programme since its inception in 1996. It will include barriers to uptake of ECommerce; the challenges of communicating with and delivering service to such a diverse market sector; ways of partnering with the commercial sector; and progress towards the target of getting 1 million UK small firms trading online by 2002.

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e-Europe and the IST Programme
Rosalie ZOBEL
Director, European Commission, Information Society Directorate General
New methods of Work and Electronic Commerce

At the European Summit Meeting in Lisbon in March of 2000, EU government leaders set a new strategic goal for the Union for the next decade: "To become the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world". The Heads of State and Government made this declaration in the context of the discussion on the eEurope Initiative which they strongly backed at the Summit. The goal of eEurope is to accelerate Europe's transition to the information society, thereby achieving greater economic progress and social cohesion. This paper will describe the objectives and rationale of this initiative and explain the contributions of the Information Society Technologies (IST) Programme, and notably its Key Action II, New methods of Work and Electronic Commerce, in creating a more competitive Europe in the digital age.

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Prime Minister's Questions
Michael COLLINS
Lloyd's Policy Signing Office, Chatham, United Kingdom

The paper takes as its context a recent quotation from Tony Blair, British Prime Minister. It considers dematerialisation of economic value, globalisation and the Internet. It deals with the reducing ability of national governments to control the long-term economic environment in which indigenous companies operate. It examines the implications for business planning, jobs and the lifestyles of people in this new and changing environment. It highlights risks of polarisation of individuals into those who are able to benefit from change and those who are not.

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Defining a framework for the new economy indicators : Challenges for companies performance and Public policy
A. BOUNFOUR
RCS, Research on Competitive Strategies
Paris, France

Defining adapted indicators for the new economy is now a major issue for policy makers and corporate competitiveness. Based on ongoing researches on intangibles and the new economy, This paper identifies the main issues and suggests a four-dimension framework as a starting point to the definition and implementation of such indicators. For policy makers in particular, experimentation and development of multiview (financial, managerial, economist, statistician) analysis and tools are recommended. EU RTD programmes themselves can be used as a field of research for such a development.

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Successful E.Commerce Business Design
Carlos H. BENITEZ
ALCATEL España, S.A., Madrid, Spain

Companies are rushing into e-commerce due to the promise of higher market capitalisation, world-wide market coverage, improved customer service, or fear of being left behind. This paper analyses major business trends in business to consumer commerce, identifies the three key strategies being used by several big e-business players and lists some strategy implementation issues to take into account. The three successful e-commerce business design strategies described are Process Redesign, Leveraging Competencies, and New Game Mentality.

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eBusiness and Organisational Change
Paul JACKSON and Lisa HARRIS
Brunel University, Uxbridge, United Kingdom

While much attention has recently been focused on the Internet start-ups, the challenge of eBusiness affects a much broader constituency of organisations. For established companies, the key challenge is one of change. Such companies must rethink fundamental aspects of company strategy, which may lead to a radical overhaul of existing ways of doing business, with company structure and culture becoming much more customer-focused. Moving organisations towards such ways of working will have widespread consequences. Resistance at all company levels may need to be overcome, with a corresponding need to build commitment and consensus around eBusiness strategies. Only by recognising and rising to these challenges, and devoting sufficient time, resources and expertise to them, will companies realise their eBusiness objectives in the time-scales they envisage.

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The Spread of Telework in 2005
Karsten GAREIS and Norbert KORDEY
empirica GmbH, Bonn, Germany

The rise of telework as a widespread way of working has profound implications for society in general and for the labour force, policy makers and IT service providers in particular. By 1999 the number of teleworkers in the European Union had reached 9 million. How will this development continue? In this paper, two models for a projection to the year 2005 are presented, based on data derived from a number of surveys covering both the general population and establishments in 10 European countries that have been conducted in 1999 as part of the ECaTT project. Results of the analysis are presented for 10 European countries.

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